Monthly Archives: February 2017

Visitation Rights for Grandparents

Many believe that grandparent should have legal right under most circumstances to visit their grandchildren. Unfortunately, some states are denying visitation rights and only make exceptions on occasions such as the death, divorce or permanent separation of the grandparent’s child. On the opposite side, some states allow anyone in the child’s ‘best interest’ to have the capabilities of obtaining legal visitation rights.

The difference that determines visitation rights is very simple, but their variation from state to state and the procedure of obtaining them can be often complex.

Some states that support more restricted visitation rights support the parent’s decision to choose what is in the best interest of the child, whereas others with more widely accessible visitation rights enable what is just in the best interest of the child. The difference is, the state has the ability to grant people visitation rights that are different than what the parent thinks is best.

For a complete list of the visitation rights by state, click here to download the PDF from the National Bar Association.

Remember that this information can change and just because a state ‘generally’ allows grandparents visitation rights, does not mean that they can and do every time. There are situations in which grandparents that would normally be granted visitation rights are denied. If you think that this may apply to you, we advise you to seek with an elder law professional in your community.

Helping Elderly Parents to Listen to Their Doctor

Time and again, you might be the person that has heard their doctor either say, “Congratulations, you are a healthy human being” or you may be the less fortunate to hear something like, “the tests show that your health has been declining, did you start eating unhealthy foods again?”

After twelve years of education, we can expect that our doctors are correct and should listen to them. However, we cannot always get our elderly parents to admire their professionalism and experience, to the point of doing what they recommend. For whatever reason, some elders just do not want to listen to their doctors.

If your elderly relative appears to be neglecting the doctor’s recommendations, it is important to first understand the reason for it. A good question to ask may be either, “I noticed that you are not doing what the doctor recommended, why is that?” or “is there a reason why you are not [insert doctors recommendations here]?”

Once you have discovered the reason why they are not following the recommendations, use this to explain to them why listening to the doctor can benefit them. Or, that listening to their doctor is important to you and that it hurts you to see them in pain, when they can help to reduce it by listening to a medical professional.

Also consider telling them that other elders are listening to their doctors, while this sounds like your child’s typical excuse to leverage more TV time, it is also called the bandwagon technique and can be effective in some situations.

Remember, every elder and every situation is unique. However, people under normal circumstances should always listen to and carefully follow their doctor’s instructions to live a healthy and productive lifestyle, especially the elderly.

The Elder Helpers Code of Ethics

1. Responsibility must be practiced by always making the best decision to benefit society. We strive to create the best relationships with volunteers and elders, believing that it is our duty to ensure the continuation of our program through your satisfaction.

2. Compassion is at the heart of our operations because we want to make the world a better place and improve the lives of elders across the world.

3. Trust in every aspect of our operations with the public and with respect to international laws and regulations. We not only expect to meet our legal obligations as a non-profit varying across countries, but we have a very high standard for ethics upheld by trust in our daily operations.

4. Generosity of all supporters and staff of our organization which allows us to consistently pursue our mission of connecting elders with volunteers desiring to help them. Without the donations from our respected supporters, our program would not be capable of its consistent growth and expansion.

5. Honor the different cultures, beliefs and practices varying from region to region across the world. Operating on a multi-national scale encourages us to be accepting of all beliefs and backgrounds to provide care for anyone who needs it regardless of their lifestyle.

6. Promise to our supporters that with their help, we will continue to provide assistance to those in need. This means that while you or a loved one is planning for retirement, having access to free care and companionship is one less factor that you need to worry about. Continued support of our mission will ensure the same thing for our volunteers’ future and generations to come.

7. Excellence is put forth in all of our strategies to improve the program for elders and voluntee­­rs. Our volunteers may donate their time to our program, but we encourage a high degree of quality in their work because it helps you to have a more enriching experience and we can achieve our mission.

8. Respect of all citizens, especially volunteers, supporters and the elderly affiliated with our organization is vital. We passionately believe that treating everyone with a high degree of respect is fundamental to our operations.

Exercises for seniors: Moving into a Better Tomorrow

Many people know that exercising can improve the health of an elder, which may be important to reducing the stress from their changing physical condition or increased dependence. Simple movement can also help home bound seniors to get the necessary exercise that they need, without having to leave the home. As a safety precaution, we always recommend that the elders ask their doctor if any exercise is right for them before they begin, but here are some fundamental ways to help the elderly to stay fit and active.

Stretching: Simple yoga can be done to help with stretching, but as daily activities decrease, yoga could become more important and may be the only physical activity that is reasonable for some elders. For stretching exercises, visit this link.

Strength: As we get older and decrease our activity, our muscles may tend to also decrease in mass and we may become weaker. Muscle mass is important to achieving stability, so that we can prevent falls from occurring and be capable of more exercises or public activities. You can view some strength training exercises in a video, by visiting this link.

Balance: This brings it all together and may be among the most important to helping the elder achieve more mobility and keeping them safer at home. A simple fall can result in serious injury that might have been caused because of reduced balance. Some elderly diseases such as osteoporosis, reduces the elders balance and increases the necessity of balance exercises. For videos on improving the elderly’s balance, visit this link.